What does vitreoretinal mean?

What does vitreoretinal mean?

Vitreoretinal diseases are conditions that affect structures in the eye called the retina and the vitreous. The retina is the light-sensitive layer in the back of the eye that focuses images and transmits that information to the brain via the optic nerve.

What causes vitreoretinal disease?

A vitreoretinal disease may occur secondary to diabetes or another health problem. Conversely, aging may be the primary risk factor for some people affected by vitreoretinal disease. Examples of conditions categorized as vitreoretinal diseases include: Macular degeneration.

How does retina get damaged?

A retinal tear occurs when the clear, gel-like substance in the center of your eye (vitreous) shrinks and tugs on the thin layer of tissue lining the back of your eye (retina) with enough traction to cause a break in the tissue.

What should I expect from vitreous surgery?

There are a number of possible risks associated with vitreous surgery. These can include swelling under the retina, a red or scratchy eye, further retinal detachment, infection or a change in focus that may require new eyeglass lenses.

What are vitrectomy surgery risks?

Some risks of the procedure include: Infection Excess bleeding High pressure in the eye New retinal detachment caused by the surgery Lens damage Increased rate of cataract formation Problems with eye movement after surgery Change in refractive error

What kind of surgery is vitrectomy?

[edit on Wikidata] Vitrectomy is surgery to remove some or all of the vitreous humor from the eye. Anterior vitrectomy entails removing small portions of the vitreous humor from the front structures of the eye—often because these are tangled in an intraocular lens or other structures.

What causes vitreous degeneration?

Some of the commonest causes of vitreous degeneration include: Aging – Advancing again and the related changes is the main cause of vitreous degeneration. Mostly affected patients are 50 years or above, while few cases of 40 years and above had also been reported.

There are a number of possible risks associated with vitreous surgery. These can include swelling under the retina, a red or scratchy eye, further retinal detachment, infection or a change in focus that may require new eyeglass lenses.

Some risks of the procedure include: Infection Excess bleeding High pressure in the eye New retinal detachment caused by the surgery Lens damage Increased rate of cataract formation Problems with eye movement after surgery Change in refractive error

[edit on Wikidata] Vitrectomy is surgery to remove some or all of the vitreous humor from the eye. Anterior vitrectomy entails removing small portions of the vitreous humor from the front structures of the eye—often because these are tangled in an intraocular lens or other structures.

Some of the commonest causes of vitreous degeneration include: Aging – Advancing again and the related changes is the main cause of vitreous degeneration. Mostly affected patients are 50 years or above, while few cases of 40 years and above had also been reported.